WA Ecology Dept: Salad Oil as Dangerous as Crude Petroleum Oil

WA Ecology Dept. now fears salad oil as much as crude oil

The Washington Department of Ecology (DOE) has found a new villain.

Tossed on your salad greens.

DOE doesn’t see vegetable oil as any less of a threat to the environment than crude petroleum oil.  And they are ready to act on their latest fears.

The agency proposed in mid-January that short-line railroads in Eastern Washington that haul animal fats and vegetable oils will have the same requirements as interstate crude oil carriers.

Railroads that haul vegetable oils already must follow rules set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

But apparently the state didn’t trust the EPA to control all their imagined  hazards associated with transporting closed containers of  Saffola.

DOE has given no evidence that food oils have caused environmental damage, or are any conceivable threat that requires new regulations. Continue reading WA Ecology Dept: Salad Oil as Dangerous as Crude Petroleum Oil

Risking their lives to wipe out polio forever

Polio remains endemic in just two countries, Pakistan and Afghanistan.  A  disease is considered endemic if it is common among a particular people or region.

Tragically, these two nations are among the most dangerous for brave health care workers who are fighting to eradicate polio.

polio pakistan 1

If polio is wiped out, it will be the second disease ever eradicated, after smallpox.

World leaders met at their biennial Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting to discuss the global effort to eradicate polio.

The Commonwealth Network represents over fifty nations.

The Terror of Polio

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a crippling and potentially deadly infectious disease. It is caused by the poliovirus.

The virus spreads from person to person and can invade an infected person’s brain and spinal cord, causing paralysis.polio snip

Paralysis is the most severe symptom associated with polio because it can lead to permanent disability and death.  Between 2 and 10 out of 100 people who have paralysis from poliovirus infection die because the virus affects the muscles that help them breathe. Continue reading Risking their lives to wipe out polio forever

2016 Dungeness Crab Fishing – WDFW video

People love tossing their crab cages into Puget Sound, in pursuit of our delectable Dungeness crabs.

Summer crabbing season is here!  But there are a lot of rules and regulations, including catch record cards, for Dungeness crab fishing in Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

Continue reading 2016 Dungeness Crab Fishing – WDFW video

Dreamers, Loggers and Trains-Capital Forest’s Early Years

Feature photo above – Bordeaux logging camp train, 1906, Clyde Cummings, engineer.  Photo from the Washington State Historical Society.

The Early Settlers

The 1870s brought the first logging claims to the Black Hills region of southwest Washington Territory.   The Black Hills got their name from the dark shadows that frequently covered the thick forested slopes.

This area would eventually become Capital State Forest–named for its close proximity to the state capital of Olympia.

In 1880, a Utopian society from Brooklyn, New York tried to settle in the area.  Most of the group didn’t last the first winter.

However, New York names like Central Park and Brooklyn still dot the nearby areas.  Undeterred by that group’s misfortunes, more Utopian groups arrived in the Puget Sound area over the next few decades.

Serious logging of the Black Hills began in the 1880s and 1890s.  Washington became the 42nd state in 1889, and Congress granted the new state 5,000 acres in what was to become Capital Forest.

A lower elevation logging camp was set up in 1898, in what would become the town of Bordeaux.

During the 1920s and 1930s, Bordeaux’s population grew to 500.

Bordeaux Logging Camp
Bordeaux Logging Camp

1902 saw the first of a series of devastating wildfires in the logging hills. Continue reading Dreamers, Loggers and Trains-Capital Forest’s Early Years

Homemade Dog Treats–They’ll Love Them!

Our dogs love this homemade treat.  You can make them any size or shape that works for your fur babies.

The key to making this  cookie firm and crunchy is to bake it at a low temperature for a long time.   I bake them at 275 degrees for about 50 minutes, and let them cool before you package them up.

No artificial ingredients here!  These can have a strong smell when they are baking, so don’t make them when fussy people might show up.

This recipe makes a lot of treats – you can cut it in half, thirds, etc. Continue reading Homemade Dog Treats–They’ll Love Them!